Following the trend and the interest of the ITS industry, this year’s World Congress is hosting several sessions around the Mobility as a Service concept. Find out more information on the sessions time and locations below or check the ITS World Congress Final Programme here.

ES10 – MOBILITY AS A SERVICE
Friday 14 October 2016, 08:30 – 10:00 Hours Plenary Hall 3

Users are already benefitting from new technology-enabled transport services that bring different choices about trip-making and support the idea of mobility on demand. Mobility as a Service is a concept that changes the use of different transport modes from a focus on ownership and management of separate systems to a user service promise. MaaS has the potential to contribute to solving many of society’s mobility problems and offers an attractive alternative to car ownership thereby giving users more choice and the possibility to influence the development of new mobility services. However MaaS will only happen through a systematic change to the ways in which we operate our transport systems. A re-definition is required regarding how we organise the transport eco-system – regulation v deregulation; private sector thinking and its business models v public transport provision; understanding the impact of MaaS on land-use planning; understanding what it takes for people to give up their private automobiles. This session will explore what needs to be done to encourage a truly user-centric transport service ecosystem.

SIS04 – REGULATION AS AN ENABLER FOR POSITIVE TRANSPORTATION CHANGE
Tuesday 11 October 2016, 1100 – 1230 Hours Meeting Room 213

The era of the transport sector, including mobility markets, as we know it will experience a dramatic overhaul. Changes in the operating models are gaining pace. During the 2015 ITS World Congress, Mobility as a Service (MaaS), eMobility and automation were hailed as future megatrends. For them to materialize, and to bring about the positive impacts desired, the current regulatory environments need to change. However, regulation is known to be rigid and slow to adjust, especially in today’s world where the speed of technological development is staggering. Therefore regulators across the globe are working hard to strike a delicate balance between enabling new, better and innovative transport services whilst securing a fair operating landscape for consumers, workforces and the environment. This session will be a moderated panel discussion. It will discuss how regulation is enabling and being adapted to the paradigm shift taking place in the transport sector. It will compare actions taken across the globe. It will also try to answer the question whether regulation is able to keep up with the pace of changes in its operating environment. Can regulation even go beyond enabling new services and bring about positive disruption?

SIS11 – VISUALIZE A TRULY MULTIMODAL MANAGED MOBILITY SYSTEM FOR YOUR SMART CITY
Tuesday 11 October 2016, 1100 – 1230 Hours Meeting Room 211

As Smart Cities emerge, leveraging cooperative ITS in creative ways will be critical in fostering an environment which produces more efficient management and operations of our transportation systems. Innovations in Connected Vehicle technologies, Integrated Corridor Management, and Decision Support Systems are making it possible to manage transport infrastructure and operations in real-time. As individuals users of the system require Mobility on Demand (MOD), Innovative operational strategies such as Demand Response Transportation and Mobility as a Service (MaaS) and new business models within the arena of shared-use mobility will make even greater impacts on our urban and rural areas. Integrating new technologies like automation, new business models like Uber and Lyft, and operational strategies like Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) through cooperative ITS will impact the way our communities move and manage mobility now and in the future.

SIS30 – MOBILITY AS A SERVICE – USER CENTRIC INTEGRATED TRANSPORT SERVICES
Wednesday 12 October 2016, 1400 – 1530 Hours Meeting Room 220

Mobility as a Service is a concept that changes the use of different transport modes from separate systems to a service promise. It has the potential to fundamentally change the behaviour of travellers in and beyond cities, hence regarded as a biggest paradigm change in transport since affordable cars came to market.Integrating services through smart, ‘Mobility as a Service’ (MaaS) solutions puts users at the heart of the transport network, offering tailor-made travel services based on preferences. These services also provide the means to achieve the smarter, simplified transportation landscape envisioned and expected by future users.This session will consider the current status of MaaS and outline plans for deployment from the Mobility as a Service Alliance

SIS17 – FUTURE MOBILITY AND MOBILITY AS A SERVICE, MOVING FROM OWNERSHIP TO ACCESS?
Friday 14 October 2016, 1300 – 1430 Hours Meeting Room 203

Although a transition to fully self-driving cars is still several years away, disruptive changes to mobility business models are already occuring. The global megatrend of the rise of the sharing economy that has disrupted industries such as tourist accommodation is starting to be felt in transport. This session will seek to address some of the questions that result from this disruption. What do these new forms of mobility look like and how will people choose to use them to get around? Given the long-standing romance of the motor car, how ready are people to move from car ownership from accessing on-demand transport services? How well might Mobility as a Service be suited to markets such as Australia and New Zealand?

SIS44 – CHANGES IN MODELING FOR THE NEW MOBILITY: PLANNING CHALLENGES FOR FUTURE TRANSPORTATION
Thursday 13 October 2016, 1100 – 1230 Hours Meeting Room 220

The shift in young people’s mobility, including extensive use of technology, NOT purchasing/owning a private automobile and lack of interest in getting a driver’s license, are, in part, changing the way we need to look at mobility. For this and several other reasons, we will need to make significant changes in travel modeling. The current travel preference modeling and analysis does not account for new mode choice behavior, especially with the advent of MaaS and Internet of Mobility, and new modes (e.g., Bridj, Uber, Lyft). Further, travel behavior will be influenced by incorporating incentives or rewards to encourage social involvement in being mobile (e.g., rating services). Finally, changes in land use due to autonomous and shared use modes will have to be included. This session will explore the current work that is being done to develop new transportation models that incorporate these elements.

SIS66 – START-UPS DISRUPTING MOBILITY
Friday 14 October 2016, 1030 – 1200 Hours Meeting Room 211

Disruption creates new opportunities, and this session is the only one at the congress to focus specifically on how start up companies are disrupting mobility. Hear from founders and CEO of start-ups in the shared mobility and Mobility as a Service sector as these entrepreneurs present how their business idea will change the future of mobility and what they have learned along their journey so far.

IBEC SESSION 2: POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF MOBILITY AS A SERVICE AND WHAT IS ALREADY PROVEN?
Tuesday 11 October 2016, 1600 – 1730 Hours Meeting Room 204

In the last couple of years several initiatives on “Mobility as a Service” (MaaS) have been undertaken around the globe. Within the MaaS concept transport services from public and private providers are promoted together as mobility packages for travellers. In this concept no one single mode (e.g. car usage) is the driver for mobility; rather mobility is the driver for single modes (e.g. having a mobility security to come from A to B). This concept would be based on a systematic change through a changed travel behaviour of people – from ownership of a vehicle towards ownership of mobility services. The first results from MaaS demonstrations and pilots are now available and will be discussed in this IBEC session. Questions will be posed such as: Are travellers willing to rely on mobility services instead of car ownership? What does a benefit-cost ratio look like for the single stakeholders – including travellers? Will sharing services promoted via MaaS led to a reduced need for public transport as well as for individual car ownership? Are there different expectations from travellers across the globe?

IBEC SESSION 2: POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF MOBILITY AS A SERVICE AND WHAT IS ALREADY PROVEN?
Tuesday 11 October 2016, 16:00 – 17:30 Hours, Meeting Room 204

In the last couple of years several initiatives on “Mobility as a Service” (MaaS) have been undertaken around the globe. Within the MaaS concept transport services from public and private providers are promoted together as mobility packages for travellers. In this concept no one single mode (e.g. car usage) is the driver for mobility; rather mobility is the driver for single modes (e.g. having a mobility security to come from A to B). This concept would be based on a systematic change through a changed travel behaviour of people – from ownership of a vehicle towards ownership of mobility services. The first results from MaaS demonstrations and pilots are now available and will be discussed in this IBEC session. Questions will be posed such as: Are travellers willing to rely on mobility services instead of car ownership? What does a benefit-cost ratio look like for the single stakeholders – including travellers? Will sharing services promoted via MaaS led to a reduced need for public transport as well as for individual car ownership? Are there different expectations from travellers across the globe?

TISA WORKSHOP ON URBAN MOBILITY, MAAS & AUTOMATED DRIVING
Wednesday 12 October 2016 – 07:30 –  11:00 Hours, Meeting Room 206

Urban mobility – “Smart Mobility 2030 Strategic ITS Plan for Singapore” by Alan Quek, Land Transport Authority Singapore

Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) – “An European Idea. A global approach. A viable solution? Possible transition scenarios.” by Sampo Hietanen, MaaS Global, and Richard Harris, Xerox

Automated driving & autonomous vehicles –  “How can autonomous vehicles be part of the solution for urban mobility and to reduce traffic problems?” by Dr Bernhard Morys, Manager, Mercedes-Benz Cars Daimler Greater China, China

TP49 – MOBILITY AS A SERVICE
Wednesday 12 October 2016, 1600 – 1730 Hours Meeting Room 218

CP03 – MOBILITY AS A SERVICE AND CONNECTED ITS
Thursday 13 October 2016, 1100 – 1230 Hours Meeting Room 101